When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson

12 October 2007

WSJ: Income inequality gap widens

The richest Americans' share of national income has hit a postwar record, surpassing the highs reached in the 1990s bull market, and underlining the divergence of economic fortunes blamed for fueling anxiety among American workers.

The wealthiest 1% of Americans earned 21.2% of all income in 2005, according to new data from the Internal Revenue Service. That is up sharply from 19% in 2004, and surpasses the previous high of 20.8% set in 2000, at the peak of the previous bull market in stocks.

The bottom 50% earned 12.8% of all income, down from 13.4% in 2004 and a bit less than their 13% share in 2000.


The IRS data go back only to 1986, but academic research suggests the rich last had this high a share of total income in the 1920s.
Income Inequality Gap Widens (Wall Street Journal, October 12, 2007; subscription required)


"Long-term problems [in the U.S. economy] include inadequate investment in economic infrastructure, rapidly rising medical and pension costs of an aging population, sizable trade and budget deficits, and stagnation of family income in the lower economic groups." (Source: CIA World Factbook, "United States - Economy")

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